Currently viewing the tag: "real-life private detective stories"

One thing we’ve learned at our investigations agency is to never provide details about an investigation task to clients until after the task is completed. Years ago we learned that lesson the hard way when an overly emotional client spilled the beans about a surveillance to the subject of that surveillance, which not only killed the investigation […]

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I love private eye characters, stories and film as much as the next guy or gal…but sometimes I groan out loud when a writer doesn’t bother to do a bit of research to add at least a whiff of realism to a private investigator’s actions. After co-owning a PI agency and having the honor to […]

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Investigations are about gathering facts to form a cohesive and well-reasoned picture of a given situation. Legal investigations are also about gathering facts for a given situation with the addition that these facts will be presented in a court of law.

The legal investigator applies her evidence/fact gathering through exacting requirements, called rules of evidence, which must be […]

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Last April, my husband-investigations-partner (and now an attorney) and yours truly presented several workshops at the Pikes Peak Writers Conference in beautiful Colorado Springs, Colorado (at the foot of Pikes Peak).  One of our workshops was Finding Missing Persons 101.  Below are several of our workshop slides from this presentation focusing […]

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Despite the thousands of private investigators throughout the U.S. (P.I. Magazine estimates there to be approximately 60,000), and the wide variety of specializations (from insurance investigators to accident reconstruction specialists to pet detectives), many people still view private investigators as Sam Spade clones.  Meaning, they’re men, they’re tough, they carry heat, […]

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We were on surveillance yesterday, parked in front of a house for sale located across the street from the real house we were surveilling. Residential neighborhoods are tough places to conduct surveillances because most people know their neighbors and the vehicles they drive, so a PI in a strange vehicle can really stick out. If […]

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